Coffee(!)
9 Comments
0Loves
25
Louis Alley
Moderator
February 6, 2014

Recently I bought a chemex and bean grinder and started making my own coffee at home. I've been using whole beans from Philz. Each week I buy two varieties, then during that week I prepare them both in a number of different ways (chemex, French press, French press to mix then pour into scheme, etc.) and try to come to a conclusion about what I like and what I don't. On most days I drink the coffee after it rides to work in a thermos.

I came across a video of a japanese siphon filter... and it was awesome. What other cool coffee ideas am I missing? Other bay area coffees I should try? Flashier coffee preparation methods? Who else is a coffee nerd?

0Loves
15
Yumee Jang
Enthusiast
February 6, 2014

I'm not really a coffee nerd and never ventured into making my own coffee at home but I do drink A LOT of coffee.. My top 5 places for coffee in order are:

Philz (Cupertino, SJ, PA, SF)
Spin City Coffee (SF)
Blue Bottle (SF)
Chromatic Coffee (SJ)
Roasted Coffee Bean (SJ)

0Loves
15
Yumee Jang
Enthusiast
February 11, 2014

We should call out Garrett Blythe on this! G I know you consume more coffee than anyone I know what do you think?!?!?!?!

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1
Garrett Blythe
Enthusiast
February 12, 2014

Brewing methods, particular grinds, bean roasts, bean origins, water quality and time investment are quite a few variables. I lately have opted for a Moccamaster and burr grinder setup at home for convenience and speed of quality product. Peet's limited edition roasts attract my dollars as I enjoy trying a different bean and flavor to keep the experience changing.

The absolute best home brewed coffees I've had are of freshest roast. I roasted beans myself for years while living in the country. The distinct smokey aroma of the roaster outside on the patio is a visceral and cherished memory. Roasting beans in and of itself is not difficult; the process shares some similarty to popping kernels of corn. But you soon learn there are different roaster qualities and beans attributes of size, oil, caffiene, chaff, intensity, et. al. One eventually considers how to approach roasting a bean to release the attributes you most admire. *You develop different attitudes for any given appellation.*

I feel that after roasting I came to appreciate the products served at local chains and shops much more than before. There are some quality products out there we often take for granted in our communities.

Coffee shops are sometimes "good" considering how cool it is to hang out there instead of excellent product. A couple of favorites based on product alone: Bellano coffee in San Jose served me one of the best cappacinos a few years ago. Another remarkable cup was enjoyed at Slingers coffee in Oklahoma City. Forgotten shop names in Taipei and Palermo rank on my favorite list as well.

After fine tuning a sense of discriminating taste, dissatisfaction does follow. I no longer willingly tolerate the average cup of joe; yet there is little choice when visiting a remote location or stuck in unknown territory. Ask a local, and keep the hope: any long period of time without coffee makes the next less than average cup that much better.

1Love
25
Louis Alley
Moderator
February 12, 2014

Cool! I'll definitely have to try Bellano. I've been ogling the Breville BES870XL, but with the size of my kitchen, I'm hesitant to commit to sacrificing the counter surface and $$$. The moccamaster reviews are pretty impressive.

PBS had a cool 3 hour series I watched this week:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TTDy-L0NKIg

This morning I tried a moka pot for the first time (blade grinder). Beans this week are Julie's Ultimate and Silken Splendor from Philz (Silken Splendor wins... flawless victory). I don't normally drink coffee black, but I did w/ the third pot (each pot makes about ~2 tea cups of coffee). Very pleased b/c I could distinctly taste the acidity, something more creamy, and then something more bitter. The moka pot coffee has been delicious like the French Press but without as much silt, although I get a lot less coffee per volume grounds (ok with me). So far I think this is my favorite method (ahead of chemex and french press). Next I want to try a siphon filter... I am tempted to get a bunson burner for show (FIRE! SCIENCE!).

My grinding isn't precise. I see 3 stages:

1) Still chunky and loud
2) Coffee grounds
3) Dust Storm

I'm aiming for a ~2.2. Grinding is my favorite part. If somebody can figure out a method to make coffee with explosions or monster trucks, I'd be all over it.

Here's a list of brewing methods I've seen. Would be cool to do some kind of double blind taste test and see what people report.

1) Drip Machine (mr. coffee)
2) Pour Over
3) French Press
4) Moka pot
5) Turkish style
6) Siphon Filter
7) Espresso machine
8) Percolator
9) Sock (lol)
10) Aeropress

0Loves
1
Dianne Kendall
DK
Enthusiast
February 14, 2014

Just tried lavazza coffee this morning and I was overwhelmed with how good it is! Can't wait for morning to come so I can endulge again!

0Loves
25
Louis Alley
Moderator
February 14, 2014

Ooh... Interesting. I worked at a company w/ a Lavazza machine. It was really loud... especially the milk foaming (but I think that comes w/ the territory). I need to try some of the brand espresso.

0Loves
7
Jennifer Mason
Enthusiast
April 24, 2015

I enjoy the "bulletproof style" coffee. I've been using coconut cream instead of butter and oil, but it's rich and delicious and helps my energy levels. Does anyone else do this?

0Loves
25
Louis Alley
Moderator
May 3, 2015

I tried bullet proof once when I ran out of cream... but I'm afraid I used salted butter, and it didn't turn out too well. Haven't tried coconut cream yet... sounds like it has potential.

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